New podcasts and video

Before Christmas I recorded a couple of new podcasts which went live this week. The first was with Luke Szymer for his Align Remotely podcast series and focused on the topic of my new book, Succeeding with OKRs in Agile and is release in two parts. Luke also has a new book, it is timely and well worth reading – as is anything Luke writes – also called Align Remotely.

The second podcast was with Ian Gill of Agility by Nature. This was a casual, wide ranging, conversation.

Finally, the video above: Living Continously with Agile and Digital.

From time to time I also give private presentations to companies. Sometimes there are existing conference or user group presentations, sometimes this is new material. While companies generally pay me for these presentations I always feel the need to share further. So, after removing any client specific references I’m re-recording these and posting them on YouTube in a Private Presentations playlist.


Subscribe to my blog newsletter and download Project Myopia for Free

Words I avoid using: should, empower, commitement

Mouth taped shut

For the record there are a few words I avoid using if I can.

Should: “we should feed the starving millions”, “we should create world peace.”

Should is useless.
It is also a declaration of what should be but also an admission of defeat, we give up immediately, we don’t even try.

Empower and empowerment: “I will empower the team”

It was Henry Mintzberg who alerted me to the problems with this word: empowerment is a loan. Empowerment is not real power, not real authority.

That I empower you means “I have the power, I am going to lend it to you… but I am still responsible and if you screw up I’m taking right back.” Thats why I prefer to talk about devolving, distributing and even sharing authority.

Commitment: “The Scrum team committed to delivering 20 points”.

Actually my dislike of commitment is usually confined to software teams and older implementations of Scrum specifically.

First commitment tends to be one sided: the development team are expected to commit but not their customers. And in an environment were the team is not completely independent (i.e. there are times when it needs non-team members to do something) it is unfair to ask them to commit.

This is very true in large companies where teams are often restricted by a multitude of rules, demarcation lines and restrictions. Such teams don’t have the power to commit on their own, they need others – and superiors – to join in making thing happen.

Second, because of those problems the word “commitment” itself has changed meaning. Originally when a team said “We commit” it meant “We are going to make this happen, come hell or high water, we will do everything in our power to make this happen.” Over time, because the team couldn’t move heaven and earth due to company policy, commitment has become devalued. Today, “commitment” has come to mean “This is the work we plan to do this sprint and we will try out best (but don’t get your hopes up too high).”

I’m sure there are some more words I avoid using but less often, I’ll make a note of them next time I’m temped and report back.


Subscribe to my blog newsletter and download Project Myopia for Free

Warning signs of a failing outsourcer

Warning sign

It is 2021 and unfortunately on Friday I felt the need to repost “Dear Customer, The Truth about IT“. Little has changed in the 10 years since I wrote the original – if I was writing it today probably the only thing I would change is “IT”, I’d write “Digital” (I should probably also change Manchester United but …).

Unfortunately the vast majority of supplier’s are engaged on the basis of their marketing materials, sales pitch and promises. This tells you nothing about their actual ability to deliver working software. The suppliers can all hire great marketing people and use the same words. They can hire and incentivise the best sales people, and they can all take you out for a good meal, a round of golf or to a strip-club. (O, and they can all find a few “satisfied customers” to provide a testimony.)

The only real way to know if a supplier can deliver is to see them in action. So how can you tell things might be going wrong? What are the warning signs?

With help from Mike Burrows and John Clapham I’ve came up with this list of early warning signs. We were thinking in the context of a client-supplier (outsourced) relationship but many of them apply if you are working with internal teams too.

Staffing

1) Supplier loads teams up with extra managers: test managers a speciality
1.1) Team members don’t make decisions and defer problems to managers: there is a manager for every problem
1.2) Offshore teams have parallel management hierarchies
1.3) Suppliers feel the need to mark all your managers with their own manager (who is then duplicated offshore)

2) Inverted staffing pyramids (few devs at the bottom, lots of managers, BAs & other non-coders above)

3) People get swapped by suppliers with little notice
3.1) Short term substitutions are made: I once saw a supplier bring in a temporary SAP HR consultant to cover the usual consultant’s 2-week holiday. There was no way the substitute could come up to speed in that time let alone contribute positively.
3.2) People bait & switch: the people you meet first met didn’t last long, they were substituted for inexperienced people
3.3) “I can do that” – you get people new to their role, you get who they have available, people with experience in one role fill another role; a project manager plays coach, a delivery manager plays scrum master

4) Part time assignees (particularly managers): work a few hours a week on the project, see 1.1.

Get ready

5) Long running “set up” phases
5.1) You spend longer pondering the future than the time it takes to create the future
5.2) A lot of time is spent agonising about infrastructure changes rather than just doing them
5.3) Team advocates for, and does, investment in infrastructure and “reusable code” before anything is usable is actually delivered

Reporting not delivering

6) Supplier does not deliver working software

7) Supplier does not deliver working software every two weeks

In 2021 delivering working software to production every two weeks, or at least usable, potentially releasable software, is table stakes. The best teams deliver multiple times a day. If the supplier can’t deliver something by the end of week 4 you have a second rate supplier. Get out now.

8) Reporting hours done rather than demonstrating working software and stories

9) “Watermelon report” Green on the outside when everything inside is Red; impressive looking reports which don’t distract from the fact that nothing, or very little, was actually complete
9.1) Claiming stuff is done when it hasn’t finished testing
9.2) A Definition of Done which leaves work not-done – Mike has a good post at agendashift.com/done.

Other warning signs

10) You invest as much time in their org design as your own, if this starts to include people performance monitoring and management what are you gaining over using your own people?

11) Suppliers always say yes: no push back and no negotiation, feedback and scrutiny of your requests are signs they are paying attention to your needs. It you ask for the impossible it is better the supplier tells you so than accepts what you ask for. Ideally you want a supplier who can highlight the difficulties with your suggestion and work with you to achieve something akin to what you want even if you have to rethink your request.

12) Your own people are disenfranchised/disgruntled/frustrated by the arrangement. Particularly noticeable where people are expected to work in a different time zone to suit the other partly and when outsourcer staff are elevated (faster, smarter, etc) over the existing people.

In most of these cases the supplier is working around their own constraints rather than putting your needs first.


Subscribe to my blog newsletter and download Project Myopia for Free

Dear customer, the truth about IT

An unhappy customer complains

10 years on I feel the need to repost this classic letter from the IT industry to our clients.

Audio version, read by Allan Kelly.

Dear customer,

I think it’s time we in the IT industry came clean about how we charge you, why our bills are sometimes a bit higher than you might expect, and why so many IT projects result in disappointment. The truth is that when we start an IT project, we don’t know how much time and effort it will take to complete. Consequently, we don’t know how much it will cost. This may not be a message you want to hear, particularly since you are absolutely certain you know what you want.

Herein lies another truth, which I’ll try to put as politely as I can. You are, after all, a customer, and, really, I shouldn’t offend you. You know the saying “The customer is always right”? The thing is, you don’t know what you want. You may know in general terms, but the devil is in the detail – and the more detail you try to give us beforehand, the more likely your desires are to change. Each time you give us more detail, you are offering more hostages to fortune.

Software engineering expert Capers Jones believes the things you want (‘requirements’, as we like to call them) change 2% per month on average – thats close to 27% over a year once you compound changes. Personally, I’m surprised that number is so low.

Just to complicate matters, the world is uncertain. Things change, and companies go out of business. Remember Enron? Remember Lehman Brothers? Customer tastes change. Remember Cabbage Patch Kids? Fashion changes, governments change, and competitors do their best to make life hard. So, really, even if you do know absolutely what you want when you first speak to us, it is unlikely that it will stay the same for very long.

I’m afraid to say that there are people in the IT industry who will take advantage of this situation. They will smile and agree with you when you tell them what you want, right up to the point when you sign. From then on, it’s a different story; they know that changes are inevitable, and they plan to make a healthy profit from change requests and late additions at your expense.

While I’m being honest, it is true we sometimes gold-plate things. You might not need a data warehouse for your online retailer on day one. Yes, some of our engineers like to do more than what is needed, and yes, we have a vested interest in getting things added so that we can charge you more.

It is also true that you quite legitimately think of features and functionality you would like after we’ve begun. You naturally assume something is ‘in’ when we assume it is ‘out’. And, in the spirit of openness, can you honestly say that you’ve never tried to put one over on us? (Let’s not even talk about bugs right now: it just complicates everything.)

Frankly, given all this, it is touching that you have so much faith in technology to deliver. But when IT does deliver, does it deliver big. Look what it did for Bill Gates and Larry Page, or Amazon and FedEx. Isn’t it interesting that when the IT industry develops things for itself, we end up with multi-millionaires? When we develop for other people, they end up losing money.

How did we ever talk you into any of this? Well, we package this unsightly mess and try to sell it to you. To do this, we have to hide all this unpleasantness. We start with a ritual called ‘estimation’ – how much time we think the work will take. These ‘estimates’ are little better than guesses. Humans can’t estimate time. We’ve known this since at least the late ’70s, when Kahneman and Tversky described the ‘planning fallacy’ in 1979 and went on to win a Nobel Prize. Basically, humans consistently underestimate how long work will take and are overconfident in their estimates.

To make things worse, we have a bad habit we really should kick. Between estimating the work and doing the work, we usually change the team. The estimate may be made by the IT equivalent of Manchester United or the New York Yankees, but the team that actually does the work is more than likely a rag-tag bunch of coders, analysts and managers who’ve never met before.

Historical data – data about estimates, actuals, costs, etc – can help inform planning, but most companies don’t have their own data. For those that do have data, most of it is worse than useless. In fact, Capers Jones suggests that inaccurate historical data is a major cause of project failure. For example, software engineers rarely get paid overtime, so tracking systems often miss these extra hours. Indeed, some companies prohibit employees from logging more than their official hours in their systems.

So we make this guess (sorry, ‘estimate’) and double it – or we might even triple it. If the new number looks too high, we might reduce it. Once our engineers have finished massaging the number, we give it to the sales folk, who massage it some more. After all, we want you to say “yes” to the biggest sticker price we can get. That might sound awful, but remember: we could have guessed higher in the first place.

Please don’t shoot me: I’m only the messenger.

We don’t know which number is ‘right’, but to make it acceptable to you, we pretend it is certain and we take on the risk. We can only do this if the number is sufficiently padded (and, even then, we go wrong). If the risk pays off, we get a fat profit. If it doesn’t, we don’t get any profit and may take a loss. If it’s really bad, you don’t get anything and we end up in court or bust.

The alternative is that you take on the risk – and the mess – and do it yourself. Unfortunately, another sad truth is that in-house IT is generally even worse than that provided by specialists. For a software company development is a core competency – such companies live or die by their ability to deliver software, and if they are bad, they cease to trade. Evolution weeds out the poor performers. Corporate IT on the other hand rarely destroys a business – although it may damage profits. Indeed, Capers Jones’ research also suggests specialist providers are generally better than corporate IT departments.

Sales folk might be absent, but the whole estimation process is open to gaming from many other sources and for many other reasons. The bottom line: if you decide to take on the risk, you may actually increase risk.

I know this sounds like a no-win scenario. You could just sit on the fence and wait for Microsoft or Google to solve your problems with a packaged solution, but will your competitors stand still while you do? Will you still be running a business when Google produces a free version?

Beware snake oil salesmen selling off-the-shelf applications. Once people start talking about ‘customisation’ or ‘configuration’, you head down a slippery slope. Configuring a large SAP installation is not a matter of selecting Tools, Options and then ticking a box. Configuring large packages is a major software development activity, no matter what you have been told. The people who undertake the configuration might be called ‘consultants’, but they are really specialist software developers, programmers by another name.

There really isn’t a nice, simple solution to any of this. We can’t solve this problem for you. We need you, but you have to work with us. As the customer, you have to be prepared to work with us, the supplier, again and again in order to reduce the risk. Addressing risks in a timely and cost-effective manner involves business-level decisions and trade-offs. If you aren’t there to help, we can either make the decision for you (adding the risk that you disagree), or spend your time and money to address it.

You need to be prepared to accept and share the risk with us. If you aren’t prepared to take on any risk, we will charge you a lot for all the risk we take on. Sharing the risk has the effect of reducing the risk, because once the risk is shared you, the customer, are motivated to reduce risk. One of the major risks on IT projects is a lack of customer involvement. You can help with that just by staying involved.

Ultimately all risk is your risk: you are the customer, you are paying for the project one way or another. If it fails to deliver value, it is your business that will suffer. When you share risks, when you are involved closely, risks can be addressed immediately rather than being allowed to fester and grow.

Finally, you may have grand ambitions, but we need to work in small chunks. I know this may not sound very sexy, but software creation works best when small. Economies of scale don’t exist. In fact, we have diseconomies of scale, so we need to work in tiny pieces again, again and again. If you are prepared to accept these suggestions, then let’s press ‘reset’ on our relationship and talk some more.

Yours sincerely,

The IT Industry


Dear Customer was first publishing this blog nearly 10 years ago, a polished version became famous in Agile Journal (now Agile Connection) a few months later and forms the prologue to Xanpan, 2015.


Subscribe to my blog newsletter and download Project Myopia eBook for Free

My story, my why

I thought I’d open 2021 year with a personal story of how I got where I am today (no, I’m not in San Francisco, although that is the Golden Gate in the picture)

Allan Kelly on the north side of the Golden Gate bridge, 2001.

I started programming when I was 12 (ZX81 then BBC) and then led a very successful career into my 30s – including a spell in California. Increasingly I found the code was not the challenge, I could make the code do what I wanted. The problem was the way we were managed, or mismanaged, the things we were ask to do and the way we were organised.

So began my journey into “management”. Determined to be a better manager than those I had worked for I took myself back to school. During a year in business school I learned a lot of good stuff, I discovered “organisational learning” and I reconnected with my dyslexia.

“Agile” was just breaking at the time and in agile I saw the same ethos of learning I was getting so excited about. The reports of agile teams I read described the best aspects of the developments I had worked on. For me, managing software delivery and enhancing agile are the same thing.

My mission became to help my younger self: help technologists deliver successful products and enjoy satisfying work. Most of what I do falls under the “agile” banner but really it is about creating the processes and environments were people can learning, thrive and excel.

When people are getting satisfaction from their work delivering great products, businesses succeed and grow. And as software has come to underpin every digital initiative my work has expanded.


For my latest blog posts, give aways and special offers on books and training subscrbe to my newsletter – and as a thank you download my Project Myopia eBook for free