Audio & free eBook of Project Myopia

A little bit of time sensitive news, albeit at the risk of overwhelming my regular readers – especially those who take this blog on the mailing list. Sorry.

The #NoProjects book, Project Myopia is available as a free ebook from Amazon (Amazon USA) for two days, Tuesday 26 February and Wednesday 27 – well, strictly speaking midnight Monday/Tuesday till midnight Wednesday/Thursday Pacific time, so 8am Tuesday to 8am Thursday GMT.

This is to celebrate the release of the audio version of Project Myopia which is now available on Audible and Amazon (where the free ebook is too), and possibly some other places where Audible has distributed it.

Unfortunately, Project Myopia will not be free in every Amazon. My full apologies, I think it is going to be free for UK and US Amazon customers, and probably Germany customer too. Elsewhere I’m not sure, Amazon don’t make it easy to find out.

I know I have readers elsewhere so I’m really sorry about this. At some time I’ll see what I can do about this restriction.

An (agile) coach’s dilemma

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I’d never met the team before. It was a small company in Cornwall and the big boss man was away on holiday that week. They took me upstairs to the meeting room. We talked for about an hour and I could tell there was something on their mind.

Eventually one of them asked:

“we have this question we’ve been talking about for ages we’d like you to help with.”

This was it, the $64,000 question.

“Ask” I said.

“Well… should we be using source code control?”

To some of you this might sound funny, to others shocking, but believe me, on average I meet one team a year who don’t use source code control. On this day I had two voices, one in each ear.

The voice in my left ear said:

“You are only a coach, you are here to help them make their own decisions. Talk about their goals, what they want to achieve, find out if they think source code control could help them. Let them explore why it might be the wrong choice.”

The voice in my other ear said:

“Jesus Christ…”

On the one hand the (agile) coach is there to help the team reach their best. The coach isn’t there to tell them what to do, the people – the team – are the experts in what they do, and they are self-organising. The coach is there to help them unlock their superhero powers.

On the other hand: the coach has done this before. If they are any good they have not only worked with many teams before and read many reports in books and blogs but they wrote the reports, their teams are in the case studies. The team may well be experts in Java, JavaScript, inertial navigation, limb-replacements or whatever but the coach is the expert in agile. The coach is there to teach.

If you’ve read about coaching in other contexts you might recognise this as a question of non-directive coaching v. directive coaching. Agile, and agile coaching has never really come to terms with that differentiation.

As a coach you have next to no authority, all you can hope is that the coachees come to respect you and trust you enough to follow your suggestions. But then, maybe you shouldn’t be suggesting anything?

But if you claim to know anything – about coaching, about agile and heaven forbid software development – is it right to hold back on them when you know the answer? Isn’t it dishonest not to say what you know – or at least sincerely believe – to be true?

And if you can see what they need to do, don’t tell them but work to help them see that answer, well… thats just manipulation isn’t it?

When do you allow free will and when do you railroad?
When do you unlock self-knowledge and when do you teach?
When do you let people take decisions you can see are mistakes?
When do you know facts that will help? And when are you just full of the same biases as everyone else?

Take the documentation question: classically trained developers who have never worked in high-performing teams commonly see documentation as the answer to so many questions:

Question: How do we make sure requirements are clear?
Answer: Documentation

Q: How do we help new recruits find their way around the system?
A: Documentation

Q: How do we keep track of the code design?
A: Documentation

Q: How do we agree which bugs to fix?
A: Documentation

Q: How do we communicate with customers?
A: Documentation

Some people just don’t know what they don’t know.

I too was trained that documentation was the answer to these questions and more, I too saw the lack of documentation as a major problem when I started work somewhere new. It took time (and Railtrack PLC) for me to realise documentation wasn’t the answer, it was John Seely Brown and Julian Orr who help me to realise documentation was a problem, and it took Capers Jones to make me see the cost of documentation.

But should I impose my view of documentation on a team? – should I even be making them see the world as I do?

Ultimately the team are self-organizing. They have the right to document, or not to document, and they can decide to ditch the coach. (Being an agile coach can be a high risk profession.)

Ultimately they are allowed to self-organize long (seated) morning meetings. They are allowed to reject TDD, BDD, CD, CI and just about every other agile practice.

And you know what? They could be right.

Coaches need to be self-aware and with that self-awareness comes self-doubt. Just because a team doesn’t follow the normal rule book doesn’t mean they are wrong. They could have a better solution. They could have a solution that works better in their context.

Back in Cornwall, I paused for a few moments while the angels on my shoulders argued their case. Then I said:

“Put it like this, without source code control I wouldn’t get out of bed in the morning.”

With that question settled I moved onto the issues. What problems would it create? Why wouldn’t you use source code control? What is the worst that could happen? What difference would big boss man see?

Arse about face really but it worked. The following morning I walked into their office and found them checking everything in.

Eight years later that small company has grown more than 20 fold: would they have done that if I had answered differently? Might they have done even better? Did I make a difference or was it all them?

But I still face dilemmas like that everyday I’m “coaching”.


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Throwing mud at a wall

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Throwing mud at a wall is a metaphor I use again and again. As a description of what I do and as a metaphor for creating change in organizations.

When you throw mud at a wall most of it falls off immediately. Some will stick for a little while then falls off. A little sticks permanent. Perhaps too little to see. So you throw some more and the same thing happens. Sometimes it looks like no mud has stuck but actually a little bit has even though you cannot see it.

Every time the mud falls off it is sad, even depressing but you have to keep throwing. Thats all you can do really.

You keep throwing, the more mud that sticks the better the chances that more will stick next time. Gradually, slowly, sometimes imperceptibly the mud builds up. As long as you can maintain your energy, stamina and resolve, you keep trying.

It can be depressing. Sometimes you can stay positive and you give up. Perhaps you move on to another wall.

In this blog, in my books, in my tweets (thankfully vastly reduced recently) I throw mud. Yes, I am a mud slinger, some people think I doing it with bad intentions. But my intentions good, I see a world that needs to think differently.

And when I’m hired to help companies I see it much the same way. I throw a lot of ideas at people, I suggest lots of changes, I throw mud at a wall and most of my ideas fall off. Much of what I suggest gets ignored. No matter how much I talk I have no authority, people are free to ignore me.

Some places I’m very successful, some less so. When I’m inside a company I try to be a bit more directed with my mud throwing, and I limit the ideas I’m throwing. But still it is a question of stamina and resolve. Some places are just more receptive to new ideas than others.

And actually, this is my model for all organizational change. To my mind, all us “change agents” (yes I hate the term too) can do is make suggestions. Throw ideas at people, if they like the ideas, if they think the idea might help then they might adopt it. But they don’t have to. It is hard to force change on people, if you try they may say they will change, they may go through the motions but sooner or later – when your back is turned – the mud will fall off.

Individuals have free will. Most of them want to work as best they can. So if some “agile coach” turns up with an idea workers don’t think will work they are free to ignore it.

I’m not a great believer in authority: just because you are blessed with the title “Manager” (or “Director” or “Executive” or even “President”) doesn’t mean people will fall your orders immediately and without question.

The best way of getting your mud to stick, getting your ideas and changes adopted is to help people understand how such changes will benefit them as individuals. Benefit them in the work they do, the quality of their life-work balance and the pride they feel in work.

Conversely, there are some people, even some organisations, who are totally unreceptive to mud. They go out of their way to avoid it. It is hard enough throwing mud which doesn’t stick, but when people don’t want it to stick, well, I’m probably better off going elsewhere.


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