Audio & free eBook of Project Myopia

A little bit of time sensitive news, albeit at the risk of overwhelming my regular readers – especially those who take this blog on the mailing list. Sorry.

The #NoProjects book, Project Myopia is available as a free ebook from Amazon (Amazon USA) for two days, Tuesday 26 February and Wednesday 27 – well, strictly speaking midnight Monday/Tuesday till midnight Wednesday/Thursday Pacific time, so 8am Tuesday to 8am Thursday GMT.

This is to celebrate the release of the audio version of Project Myopia which is now available on Audible and Amazon (where the free ebook is too), and possibly some other places where Audible has distributed it.

Unfortunately, Project Myopia will not be free in every Amazon. My full apologies, I think it is going to be free for UK and US Amazon customers, and probably Germany customer too. Elsewhere I’m not sure, Amazon don’t make it easy to find out.

I know I have readers elsewhere so I’m really sorry about this. At some time I’ll see what I can do about this restriction.

An (agile) coach’s dilemma

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I’d never met the team before. It was a small company in Cornwall and the big boss man was away on holiday that week. They took me upstairs to the meeting room. We talked for about an hour and I could tell there was something on their mind.

Eventually one of them asked:

“we have this question we’ve been talking about for ages we’d like you to help with.”

This was it, the $64,000 question.

“Ask” I said.

“Well… should we be using source code control?”

To some of you this might sound funny, to others shocking, but believe me, on average I meet one team a year who don’t use source code control. On this day I had two voices, one in each ear.

The voice in my left ear said:

“You are only a coach, you are here to help them make their own decisions. Talk about their goals, what they want to achieve, find out if they think source code control could help them. Let them explore why it might be the wrong choice.”

The voice in my other ear said:

“Jesus Christ…”

On the one hand the (agile) coach is there to help the team reach their best. The coach isn’t there to tell them what to do, the people – the team – are the experts in what they do, and they are self-organising. The coach is there to help them unlock their superhero powers.

On the other hand: the coach has done this before. If they are any good they have not only worked with many teams before and read many reports in books and blogs but they wrote the reports, their teams are in the case studies. The team may well be experts in Java, JavaScript, inertial navigation, limb-replacements or whatever but the coach is the expert in agile. The coach is there to teach.

If you’ve read about coaching in other contexts you might recognise this as a question of non-directive coaching v. directive coaching. Agile, and agile coaching has never really come to terms with that differentiation.

As a coach you have next to no authority, all you can hope is that the coachees come to respect you and trust you enough to follow your suggestions. But then, maybe you shouldn’t be suggesting anything?

But if you claim to know anything – about coaching, about agile and heaven forbid software development – is it right to hold back on them when you know the answer? Isn’t it dishonest not to say what you know – or at least sincerely believe – to be true?

And if you can see what they need to do, don’t tell them but work to help them see that answer, well… thats just manipulation isn’t it?

When do you allow free will and when do you railroad?
When do you unlock self-knowledge and when do you teach?
When do you let people take decisions you can see are mistakes?
When do you know facts that will help? And when are you just full of the same biases as everyone else?

Take the documentation question: classically trained developers who have never worked in high-performing teams commonly see documentation as the answer to so many questions:

Question: How do we make sure requirements are clear?
Answer: Documentation

Q: How do we help new recruits find their way around the system?
A: Documentation

Q: How do we keep track of the code design?
A: Documentation

Q: How do we agree which bugs to fix?
A: Documentation

Q: How do we communicate with customers?
A: Documentation

Some people just don’t know what they don’t know.

I too was trained that documentation was the answer to these questions and more, I too saw the lack of documentation as a major problem when I started work somewhere new. It took time (and Railtrack PLC) for me to realise documentation wasn’t the answer, it was John Seely Brown and Julian Orr who help me to realise documentation was a problem, and it took Capers Jones to make me see the cost of documentation.

But should I impose my view of documentation on a team? – should I even be making them see the world as I do?

Ultimately the team are self-organizing. They have the right to document, or not to document, and they can decide to ditch the coach. (Being an agile coach can be a high risk profession.)

Ultimately they are allowed to self-organize long (seated) morning meetings. They are allowed to reject TDD, BDD, CD, CI and just about every other agile practice.

And you know what? They could be right.

Coaches need to be self-aware and with that self-awareness comes self-doubt. Just because a team doesn’t follow the normal rule book doesn’t mean they are wrong. They could have a better solution. They could have a solution that works better in their context.

Back in Cornwall, I paused for a few moments while the angels on my shoulders argued their case. Then I said:

“Put it like this, without source code control I wouldn’t get out of bed in the morning.”

With that question settled I moved onto the issues. What problems would it create? Why wouldn’t you use source code control? What is the worst that could happen? What difference would big boss man see?

Arse about face really but it worked. The following morning I walked into their office and found them checking everything in.

Eight years later that small company has grown more than 20 fold: would they have done that if I had answered differently? Might they have done even better? Did I make a difference or was it all them?

But I still face dilemmas like that everyday I’m “coaching”.


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Throwing mud at a wall

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Throwing mud at a wall is a metaphor I use again and again. As a description of what I do and as a metaphor for creating change in organizations.

When you throw mud at a wall most of it falls off immediately. Some will stick for a little while then falls off. A little sticks permanent. Perhaps too little to see. So you throw some more and the same thing happens. Sometimes it looks like no mud has stuck but actually a little bit has even though you cannot see it.

Every time the mud falls off it is sad, even depressing but you have to keep throwing. Thats all you can do really.

You keep throwing, the more mud that sticks the better the chances that more will stick next time. Gradually, slowly, sometimes imperceptibly the mud builds up. As long as you can maintain your energy, stamina and resolve, you keep trying.

It can be depressing. Sometimes you can stay positive and you give up. Perhaps you move on to another wall.

In this blog, in my books, in my tweets (thankfully vastly reduced recently) I throw mud. Yes, I am a mud slinger, some people think I doing it with bad intentions. But my intentions good, I see a world that needs to think differently.

And when I’m hired to help companies I see it much the same way. I throw a lot of ideas at people, I suggest lots of changes, I throw mud at a wall and most of my ideas fall off. Much of what I suggest gets ignored. No matter how much I talk I have no authority, people are free to ignore me.

Some places I’m very successful, some less so. When I’m inside a company I try to be a bit more directed with my mud throwing, and I limit the ideas I’m throwing. But still it is a question of stamina and resolve. Some places are just more receptive to new ideas than others.

And actually, this is my model for all organizational change. To my mind, all us “change agents” (yes I hate the term too) can do is make suggestions. Throw ideas at people, if they like the ideas, if they think the idea might help then they might adopt it. But they don’t have to. It is hard to force change on people, if you try they may say they will change, they may go through the motions but sooner or later – when your back is turned – the mud will fall off.

Individuals have free will. Most of them want to work as best they can. So if some “agile coach” turns up with an idea workers don’t think will work they are free to ignore it.

I’m not a great believer in authority: just because you are blessed with the title “Manager” (or “Director” or “Executive” or even “President”) doesn’t mean people will fall your orders immediately and without question.

The best way of getting your mud to stick, getting your ideas and changes adopted is to help people understand how such changes will benefit them as individuals. Benefit them in the work they do, the quality of their life-work balance and the pride they feel in work.

Conversely, there are some people, even some organisations, who are totally unreceptive to mud. They go out of their way to avoid it. It is hard enough throwing mud which doesn’t stick, but when people don’t want it to stick, well, I’m probably better off going elsewhere.


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Error handling omitted for brevity

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Q: What is the difference between programming in college and programming in the real world?
A: Error handling

Do you remember when you were learning to program? Do you remember those text books you had back in college? And do you remember what they said about error handling?

As I remember it most of what they said about error handling was:

        /* error handling omitted for brevity */

Or perhaps:

        (* error handling omitted for brevity *)

Back in college error handling hardly got a mention, and if it did it was to abort the program. Yet in the real world 80% of what you program is error handling, or rather exceptions, the corner cases, what happens when things go wrong.

I’ve been saying this for years but this week I realised how shocking this was.

A couple of years ago a paper entitled “Simple Testing Can Prevent Most Critical Failures: An Analysis of Production Failures in Distributed Data-Intensive Systems” (2014, you know its an academic paper because it has 8 authors)) was momentarily famous on Twitter. I grabbed it and had a quick read but this week I had reason to go back and look at it again. In the process I found a 20 minutes video presentation by one of the authors.

To cut a long story short, the authors looked at the source code for large open source applications (Cassandra, MapReduce, etc) and software failures. Among various finding they reported:

  • Finding 1: “A majority (77%) of the failures require more than one input event to manifest, but most of the failures (90%) require no more than 3” – so even if didn’t happen very often, they were difficult to simulate in system testing
  • Finding 9: “A majority of the production failures (77%) can be reproduced by a unit test.” (Yes the reoccurrence of 77% is suspicion but I think it is an improbably but genuine co-incidence, please read the paper or watch the video before you fault the paper on this.)
  • Finding 10: “Almost all catastrophic failures (92%) are the result of incorrect handling of non-fatal errors explicitly signalled in software.”
  • Finding 11 “35% of the catastrophic failures are caused by trivial mistakes in error handling logic — ones that simply violate best programming practices; and that can be detected without system specific knowledge.”

The authors even created a tool to scan code for some of these problems. In many cases they found code like:

catch (…) {
        // TODO
}

catch (Exception e) {
        /* will never happen */
}

My old jibe about error handling looked very real.

This morning I pulled some old books off my shelves and was shocked by what I found:

First the book I was prescribed at not one but two University programming courses: “Problem Solving and Structured Programming in Modula-2” by Elliot B. Kaufman (1988).

I can’t find “Error handling omitted” in this book, my memory was wrong but the book is worse. I can’t find any error handling to speak of! I found one example which returns a boolean success/fail flag but there is no discussion of what to do with it. “Error handling” is not even in the index, let alone the table of contents – actually “Error” isn’t even there.

Each chapter ends with a “Common Programming Errors” section but this section is mostly about compile time errors.

Next I looked at the silver book, Wirth’s “Pascal User Manual and Report” (1991). I can only find two references to “errors” (nothing to exception). Both these references are in the report section and don’t say anything about how to program error handling.

As I looked at more old books I noticed how they just assumed everything worked well.

K&R is slightly better – “The C Programming Language” by Kernighan and Ritchie (1988) that is. Most of the examples here do check for errors, then printf. Sometimes that is it, sometimes there return 0 or break. On page 164 they say:

“We have generally not worried about exit status in our small illustrative programs, but any serious program should take care to return sensible, useful status values.”

In other words: Error handling omitted for brevity.

Moving away from the introductory books I turned to what might be the longest single volume technical book I ever read. A book I quoted as a bible, a book who’s author I still put on a pedestal: “Large Scale C++ Software Design”, John Lakos (1996). While John does say a bit more about error handling it does not feature in the index and there is no dedicated section to it. Looking at it now I am in disbelief, how could a book a large scale C++ not have at least one chapter on error handling?

Of the books I look at this morning only Kernighan and Pike’s “Practice of Programming” (1999) gave any coverage to error handling. And that isn’t saying much.

OK, these are all ancient books. Have things changed? – you tell me.

I hope more recent books, in more modern languages have got better – and my old (1999) copy of “Learning Python” (Ascher) contains a whole chapter on exceptions as does Stroustrup’s “C++ Programming Language” (2000).

But I am sure error and exception handling hasn’t got any simpler. I can’t believe that JavaScript, PHP, Swift, and simiar. have somehow made the problem go away. “Throw exception(blah, blah, blah)” might be a great improvement over “return -1” but I can’t imagine handling these cases has got easier.

Based on the “Simple Testing” paper improvements in training programmer in error handling need to be redoubled.


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The power of small declines

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Last year I wrote about the power of 1% improvement, and how powerful this can be when that improvement occurs frequently. For example, if a team improves 1% a week then over the course of 50 weeks (a year) they would improve by over 62%.

A few days ago I had a revelation: the opposite is also true.

If a team enters a downward spiral then a 1% decline in productivity each week has similar effects but in the opposite direction. In fact, as I think about this I see more and more occasions where a team can loose small amounts of performance which actually saps their productive capacity. Like the frog in hot water they don’t realise they are cooked until it is too late.

The graph above shows what happens to value-add over a year when a team is 1% less productive each week. The blue bars show how value-add falls each week. The red line shows how each week the team declines slightly compared to the week before.

That the red line get higher seems odd but it makes sense: each week the team is 1% less productive than the week before. So at the end of the second week the team is 1% less productive than they were in the first week. At the end of week 50 they are 1% less productive than week 49 but only 0.62% more less productive than week 1 because the 1% decline was from a lower total. Getting worse slows down because the team are worse!

At some point the value-add ceases to justify the cost of the team. But as these changes are very gradual that is going to be hard to see.

Why might this happen? – lots of reasons

First off there are the corporate drains on productivity. Consider corporate security processes: think about passwords alone, the need to change passwords regularly, have longer and longer passwords, have different passwords on different systems, and so on. Sure cyber security is important but it can also be a drain on productivity.

Then there are the other hassles of working almost anywhere: finding meeting rooms, booking meeting rooms, setting up webex conference calls, “cake in the kitchen”, restrictions on internet use – whether it is limited access, site blacklists, or authorised “white list” sites only.

It is easy to see how a large corporate can gradually drain a team. But there are other reasons.

There are personal drains on productivity too. Consider internet use during work time. The likes of Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter which aim to keep you on their sites as long as possible. Using LinkedIn is almost a necessity in modern work – got a meeting coming up? someone applied for a job? looking for a lead? – but once your in, Microsoft wants to keep you there.

Then think about your code base: is the code getting better or worse?

  • Easier to work with or harder to work with?
  • Do you write an automated test for every change? Or save time today at the cost of time tomorrow, and the next day, and the day after, and …
  • Do you take time to refactor every time you make a change? or are you constantly kludging it and making the next change slightly harder?

Notice here I’m not talking about those big time consuming changes that happen occasionally: new employees, reorganisations, mergers – things that happen occasionally, take a chunk of time but finish.

So, is your work environment getting a little bit better every week? or a little bit harder?

If we think at the “very little” level it is unlikely that things are the same as last week. Staying the same will be hard. Things are probably a little bit better or a little bit harder. Extend that over a year and – as the theory of 1% change shows – things are a lot worse, or maybe a lot better.

What is important is the trend, and the trend is going to be set by the culture. Do you have a culture of small improvements? Or an acceptance of small degradation?

Finally, because there are so many minor factors that can sap your productivity capacity then it is quite likely that if you aren’t getting more productive then you are getting less. In other words, you need to be working to improve just to stand still.

NoNo workshop in London

Smaller cartons of software are cheaper and less risky
Smaller cartons of software are cheaper and less risky

 

Vasco Duarte and myself are running our #NoProjects/#NoEstimates workshop again in London – February. This is a one day class with myself and Vasco, it is very interactive, lots of exercises and lots of changes to ask us your questions.

 

“A one day introduction to #NoEstimates and #NoProjects. Learn to apply the digital-first tools that help you deliver more value in less time. From breaking down 9 month projects to 30 minutes, to learning to reduce investment risks. In this workshop you will learn how to transform your product development.”

More details and booking at the Learning Connexions website.

PS A discount code for my December workshop

Learning Connexions and I are running my “Requirements Backlogs and User Stories” workshop next Monday – 3 December in London. They have set up a Black Friday discount code which is only good today and reduces the price by 20% – so just under £500 for a day (including lunch!)

The code is: BLUEFRIDAY2K18
And actually it works with all their courses not just mine.

As for the day itself, the title pretty much says it all. We do some exercises, we review some actual user stories, we value some stories and we talk a lot. I deliberately keep the classes small so that we have plenty of time to discuss the things attendees want to talk about.

Most of the attendees are Product Owners, Product Managers or Business Analysts. We also get a few developers and project managers along too. But whatever your role I’m sure you will learn something,

And sorry, if I’d known this a few days earlier I’d have included this in my last post.

Money talks: A tale of two change programs

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Like many in the agile community – or what sometimes gets called the agile industrial complex – I am all for piecemeal adoption, small scale before large scale, get good at doing stuff then expand it out… – what else would you expect from Mr Diseconomies of Scale?

The “start small” and grow might even be regarded as the canonical approach to agile implementation. But from time to time I run across something that makes me wonder…

Four or five years back I got involved with an agile transformation programme at a large financial institution, not a bank, more of a mass market asset manager. I was attached to a small team trying to make the whole company agile.

The coaches viewed themselves as a guerrilla movement, changing the organization from within. They had some success, there was a bunch of stuff the agile teams and the coaches were doing wrong but that is another story. This was a licensed insurrection.

As is often the case, this team found it lacked the ability to ask the big questions and get people outside the team (often the higher ups) to engage or change themselves. The organization wanted agile down in the engine room – at the code face – but they didn’t want to rethink how they set requirements and approached projects. The whole organization was chronically project driven, obsessed with long term planning and offshore development. Economies of scale thinking ran riot.

Because the agile change was at the team level the product owners lacked authority to make real decisions – like not delivering functionality. Yes the organization wanted to “be agile” but the management cadre didn’t see any need to change their own behaviour.

One day I met two men who ran the company’s “Software Process Group.” They were guardians of the formal process and “working practices”. My immediate reaction was that they wanted to kill agile and stick with ISO-9000, PRINCE2, CMMI and certified approaches. They scared me. But actually they were very clued up. They got agile. They saw it was better than the current process.

These two had no role in the agile transformation, their role was to ensure the company kept its CMMI level two certification. This was really important to the company because this allowed the company to do business. They told me a story…

During the previous 20 years the company had grown large, very large, by buying up competitors and companies in related markets. These companies had been thrown together and costs stripped out. One day the financial regulator came to the company and said:

“We have been examining your IT functions. They are not fit for purpose. If you don’t fix it within 12 months we are going to withdraw your license to do business.”

Shit hitting the fan doesn’t come much bigger than this.

The company went to IBM and said “Help! – Fix it – we’ll will pay anything.”

IBM flooded the company with people. IBM imposed a process – a traditional CMMI compliant process. IBM changed the company, not just the programmers but everything. The company did as IBM told them.

And don’t imagine it was cheap. I bet that the change and IBM fees were on the agenda at every board meeting during that period. The men I had met were the remnants of that programme, they worked for the company not IBM, their job was to ensure the company maintained accreditation and the financial regulator wouldn’t have cause to come back.

Now contrast this with the piecemeal, small scale, bottom-up change that us agile folk are so fond of. Time and time again we get stuck: “the business won’t change”, “we can’t get access to the senior people”, “existing processes and expectations are unassailable”, “projects are killing us” and so on.

I’m sure IBM faced many of those same problems but they had one big advantage: They were expensive.

OK, they had a second: the loss of license would destroy the client company. But when threatened people often respond by sticking with that they know so maybe it was a double edged sword.

Because IBM were expensive they had access to anyone they wanted access too. Because they were expensive they had authority. And if someone didn’t want to make the changes IBM suggested then IBM could simply ask the next person up.

Once again money is information: by spending lots of money with IBM the company was signalling it really wanted these changes to happen.

Agile changers may not like big change, they may point to the inherent risks, they may point that use of authority conflicts with self-organization, they may understand that diseconomies of scale rule and they may point to a bunch of other risks.

But they should also note one clear advantage: a big expensive change programme brings authority all of its own.

Agile won the war but lost the peace

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“I’ve spoken of the shining city all my political life, … in my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, wind-swept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That’s how I saw it, and see it still” President Ronald Reagan, Farewell to the Nation, January 11, 1989

Back in 2001 when the word agile appeared it was a manifesto – a set of ideas, the term “agile” also served to group a bunch of tools and techniques which could make software development “better.” More importantly to my mind, it painted a picture of a shining city on a hill we all wanted to live in.

Agile was a place you wanted to go, it was a journey you wanted to make, it offered hope. More important as the tools – sprints, stand-ups, etc. – and approaches – just in time, last responsible moment, test first – were the stories agile people – including myself – told. These were stories of a better world, of that shining city on the hill.

And not unimportantly, in a world of search engines “agile” gave you something to search for. Before agile you could search “make my software development team better” or “software development process improvement” but what you got was a very mixed offering. AltaVista (and the young Google) would suggest links for CMMI, or ISO-9000, or vendor tools to “fix it”, or proper design, or… there was no coherent message. Most of these ideas resolved around senior people making big decisions and then imposing them.

Then along came agile: it offered to involve everyone, everyone made decisions, everyone was happy and we could all go to that shining city on a hill – more than that, we all had an important part to play in building that city.

Today everyone is agile. Nobody is promoting traditional (“waterfall”) working, CMMI, PMI and everyone else has incorporated agile (to some degree). Not being agile is about as popular as leprosy.

But very few of us have reached the shining city on the hill.

Along the way agile has been watered down, in becoming compatible with everything else it is less different, it is less attractive, fewer workers are motivated to take the journey. And as “the powers that be” have found ways to bring control-and-command back to teams (maybe in the name of scaling) fewer people are invited to help build the city.

Ironically, as we (the agile community) has made agile management friendly we have made it less worker friendly. Today senior managers “get agile” and want their organisations to be agile. But those at the code face seem to have less and less motivation. And those in the middle… sometimes they seem to want to change just enough to declare success but no so much that things really change.

For some people agile has become completely discredited – I wrote Why do Dev’s hate agile? last year and I’m presenting it in London next week. Agile isn’t a shining city on a hill, agile is trench warfare.

And Googling “agile” presents a long long list of links with less and less coherence.

Agile won the war. Agile is respectable and everyone is agile now. Big business rush to be agile, Governments want to be agile, blue-chip consultancies will sell you agile.

But agile lost the peace.

While many say they are agile, few software developers live in a shiny city. The place they live in might be better than the place they came from but it doesn’t live up to the dream many of us shared 15 years ago. Agile has become an excuse for failure and a thing to be imposed.

The thing that passes for “agile” today is too often a watered down version of the original dream. Worse still, we don’t have a word to describe that shining city we all want to get to. Russians have an expression for this:

“We wanted the best, it turned out like always.” Viktor Stepanovich Chernomyrdin, Prime Minister Russia, 1998-1999

Me? – I still dream of that shining city on the hill, I still believe agile is the right way to get there, I still wave the flag for agile but more and more I feel the need to explain myself and tell people that the agile I dream of is not the agile they may experience.


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